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At the 2013 National Auctioneers Association (NAA) International Auctioneer Championship (IAC) recently held Friday, July 19 in Indianapolis, Indiana, three questions were asked of the contestants. Here, we note those three questions and our answers to them:

  • With the ever-growing popularity and use of Internet bidding, how do you determine when to use this method or traditional outcry bidding?
  • Our new vision statement states that National Auctioneers Association members will be the preferred auction professionals used in the marketplace. In your opinion, what type of action will need to take place in order to make this happen?

With the ever-growing popularity and use of Internet bidding, how do you determine when to use this method or traditional outcry bidding?

    We previously wrote about choosing between selling live or online here: https://mikebrandlyauctioneer.wordpress.com/2012/05/15/selling-at-auction-online-and-live/. Many studies on this subject conclude that the choice should be either, as doing both combine increased participation costs (live) with valuation uncertainly (online.) Do certain items sell better live? Do certain items sell better online? Our feeling is that the live environment is preferred for items which are difficult to value without being present; online should be used more for the commodity, where valuation uncertainty is low. Lastly, there are other considerations — most notably the client’s needs and desires. For instance, a live auction can many times get the property in the hands of a buyer (and the money in the hands of the seller) quicker. However, an online auction can better preserve seller identity and possibly better serve smaller inventories.

In your opinion, should the National Auctioneers Association serve the auctioneer — or the auction profession — and why?

    It seems to me that the National Auctioneers Association has always served the auction profession. Since NAA was formed in 1949, it has served auctioneers, spouses, and auction staff members — either directly at Conference & Show, seminars and meetings — or indirectly as auctioneers brought that information home for dissemination. Should NAA focus on the auctioneer or the auction profession? It is called the National Auctioneers Association, and since the actual service has remained virtually constant, the focus might just stay the same as well. The more any company or association attempts to serve a wide variety of interests, the more difficult such groups find it to serve any well.

Our new vision statement states that National Auctioneers Association members will be the preferred auction professionals used in the marketplace. In your opinion, what type of action will need to take place to make this happen?

    It would be wonderful if the National Auctioneers Association could solely promote the membership’s interests. However, members have a responsibility to promote their own interests. NAA’s primary role should be to educate members on how to promote their own interests … and NAA does that. With the Conference and Show, seminars and designation classes, NAA members are the best educated auctioneers on earth.

Mike Brandly, Auctioneer, CAI, AARE has been an auctioneer and certified appraiser for over 30 years. His company’s auctions are located at: Mike Brandly, Auctioneer, Keller Williams Auctions and Goodwill Columbus Car Auction. His Facebook page is: www.facebook.com/mbauctioneer. He serves as Adjunct Faculty at Columbus State Community College and is Executive Director of The Ohio Auction School.